Pequot War Grant Initiatives

Battlefield Preservation News

Earlier this month, Jenny Scofield and Cathy Labadia visited Old Saybrook to visit archaeological sites associated with the Siege and Battle of Saybrook Fort. Tedd Levy, historian and Project Director at the Old Saybrook Historical Society, has been instrumental in preserving and sharing the story of these sites. He arranged the tour with Dr. Kevin McBride, archaeology professor at the University of Connecticut, who is preparing a multiple property listing to the National Register of Historic Places for the sites. Together these locations represent a series of important events that occurred from September 1636 to April of 1637 when the Pequot retaliated against English actions by repeatedly attacking the new English settlement at Fort Saybrook. During the nearly six-month Pequot siege on Saybrook, the Pequot won every single engagement. The Pequot’s tactics demonstrated military organization, knowledge of large-scale regional warfare, and skills gained during the Pequot-Dutch War in 1634. The sequence of events at Old Saybrook are important to understanding the context for the Connecticut General Court declaring war on the Pequot during May of 1637.

"Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort," funded by American Battlefield Protection Program, National Park Service

GETTING SAYBROOK FORT ON THE LIST

 
A capacity crowd filled the Vicki Duffy Pavilion at Saybrook Point in mid-October to hear about the plans to list the sites related to the siege and battles of Saybrook Fort (1636-1637) on the National Register of Historic Places and to take a guided walking tour of nearby sites.
 
Through a project funded by the American Battlefield Protection Program, National Park Service, the Old Saybrook Historical Society is working to help preserve these sites and develop educational materials for schools and the public.
 
Fort Saybrook was the first military post to be built by European in the Connecticut wilderness and the area at and around the fort became the site for the most prolonged and intensive fighting of the Pequot War.
 
This original fort was constructed in 1636-37 and located at the highest point on Saybrook Point, not to be confused with Saybrook Fort Memorial Park which was the location of the second fort.  The first fort was destroyed by fire in 1647. 
 
After the October walking tour Dr. Kevin McBride and his team from the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center discussed the development of an informational brochure, the placement of historic markers, and the application for listing the sites in the National Register of Historic Places, the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation.
 
If you missed this informative and enjoyable walking tour, the Society is planning another tour in the spring. 
 
For more information about Saybrook Fort and the project, or to receive email notices of future events, send an email to:    contact@saybrookhistory.org
Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort - May 12, 2019

Siege and Battles of Saybrook Fort – May 12, 2019

THE WAR AT SAYBROOK FORT

Saybrook Fort was the first military post to be built by Europeans in the Connecticut wilderness and the area became the site for the most prolonged and intensive fighting of the Pequot War.

 To increase understanding and appreciation of this important Fort site and its role in the Pequot War, the Historical Society has been engaged in a project supported by the American Battlefield Protection Program to develop materials and programs for educators and the general public.

 A report on these developments will be presented for the public program at Saybrook Point Pavilion, on Sunday, May 12, 2019 at 2:00 p.m.

 Presenting these findings after a multi-year archaeological and historical study will be Dr. Kevin McBride, Univ. of Connecticut archaeologist and David Naumen, military historian at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center.

 In addition, a brief report of work done to provide materials for educators will be presented by James Powers, former educator and now principal of Seeking the Past -Historical Consultants.

 Following the program there will be short talking tour of nearby sites related to Saybrook Fort and the Pequot War.

 The original Saybrook Fort was constructed in 1636-1637 and located at the highest point on Saybrook Point, not to be confused with Saybrook Fort Monument Park which was the approximate location of the second fort.  The first fort was destroyed by fire in 1647.

 The Historical Society is currently working to have the Fort listed on the State and National Register of Historic Places, the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation.

 Funding for the Saybrook Fort program comes from the National Park Service, American Battlefield Protection Program.  For further information about Saybrook Fort or the Society’s work, email:  contact@saybrookhistory.org or call 860-395-1635.

National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archeological resources.
 
What is the National Register of Historic Places?
Administered by the National Park Service, the National Register of Historic Places is the U.S. government’s official list of districts, landscapes, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed significant in U.S. history. A property that’s considered eligible for inclusion in the National Register has significance to the history of its community, state, or the nation and is considered worthy of preservation.
 
Why should a battlefield be listed in the National Register?
Listing a battlefield provides formal recognition of its historical significance based on national standards used by all state and Federal agencies. The nomination process requires that a battlefield’s significance be documented, that it be located on the landscape, and that boundaries be drawn to identify the battlefield. 
 
Are there any restrictions, rules, or regulations that apply if a battlefield is listed in the National Register?
As long as there are is no Federal interest attached to the battlefield there are no restrictions, rules, or regulations placed by the Federal government. If there is a Federal interest (generally through Federal licenses, projects or ownership), then any proposed changes to the battlefield must go through a compliance process.  In addition, there may be state or local preservation laws that place restrictions on any property listed in the National Register. 
 
Who can nominate a battlefield for listing in the National Register?
Anyone may initiate the nomination process and prepare the necessary forms and documentation.
 
What is the nomination process?
Once the nomination forms and documentation are completed, they’re sent to the State Historic Preservation Office [SHPO] where the battlefield is located. The SHPO reviews the nomination and either rejects the nomination, asks for more information, lists the battlefield with the state only, or sends the documentation to the National Register of Historic Places for consideration. The National Register will then conduct a similar review process for the battlefield and determine if it is eligible for listing in the National Register.
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For information and publications related to Old Saybrook history, Saybrook Fort, the Pequot War and other local history topics, visit the Frank Stevenson Archives, 350 Main Street, Old Saybrook, open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 – 12 or by appointment.  

For online information about the Pequot War, visit these web sites

 

If you wish to learn more about the Pequot War or are a teacher, these sites offer a good, quick start for understanding this important historic event.

 
Containing the following sections:
This site was created by Mark Williams, a history teacher at The Loomis Chaffee School, Windsor, Connecticut, under a grant from the Connecticut Humanities Council. Some of the materials published here were originally created by Mark Williams as Connecticut Case Studies, under a grant from the Connecticut Humanities Council, and printed by the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company.  Connecticut Humanities is the State Committee of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The viewpoints or recommendations expressed in the materials on this site are not necessarily those of CT Humanities or the Endowment.  
 
An online publications that provides an informative overview of Native American and Pequot life, with brief sections related to the Pequot War.
A useful, fairly brief overview of the Pequot War.

Organizations

American Battlefields Protection Program
National Park Service
1849 C Street NW
Washington DC 20240

American Battlefield Protection Program

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